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Be Well Advised Series:
April Goldade
Decluttering Specialist

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About April

Bio:

April Goldade. Mom, partner, business co-owner & organizing devotee. On a mission to live her life with the utmost intention. April stumbled upon her decluttering journey 9 years ago. Always having a passion for design, organization and all things homey she took these strengths through her careers. It wasn’t until she experienced the real struggle of trying to balance a family and a career that she started to look at organizing on a different level. Understanding that to truly declutter you have to commit to the journey, April is committed to supporting other busy woman get control of the clutter in their homes for good, creating space for the things that matter most.

What do you like about your neighbourhood?

"We live on the West-bench of Penticton and love living here for so many reasons - the views, easy access to tons of trails, minutes from downtown but feel like you’re miles away and our elementary school is amazing! With 118 students K-5 the class sizes are small and focused and they have a great outdoor program for the kids. We stumbled upon this community by chance but can see ourselves staying for a long time."

Contact April

Visit her blog at aprilgoldade.com


Interview Transcription:

Christy:
And welcome April Goldade.

April Goldade:
Hi ladies. Thanks for having me.

Christy:
Oh, you're so welcome. Thanks for joining us today. And I love that we're talking about, I think something that everybody's tackled over this last COVID time is, "What am I doing inside my house?" And looking at like, "Wow, I've got a lot of stuff happening here." I love that you have your website, aprilgoldade.com, and it's your blog that helps people create space in their home.

April Goldade:
Yeah.

Lora:
It's super timely right now, because this morning I woke up and I came out to the kitchen, like I do every morning, and I just start turning corners and opening drawers and the anxiety just kept building. And the kids come downstairs and they're looking at me and I'm kind of slamming things and things are all disarray. I go upstairs, Brynn can't find her shirt and it's just like, my house is completely disorganized.

Lora:
So the kids got home. Brynn said, this was funny, I said to her, "Do you want some breakfast?" She goes, "No, I just want to get to school." I was like, "Okay. I got to dial back the anxiety here because all she wants to do is get away from me right now." So anyways. And then it was kind of interesting because I was going through social media while I was drinking my coffee. And it said, "How much of your house would you rebuy if you had the chance today?"

Lora:
And Christy and I talked earlier about this, we were like, "I don't know, 10%." Like, it's just so timely right now for you to kind of come on and chat with us about this.

April Goldade:
Yeah. Yeah. Well, this is kind of my jam and it's interesting because totally going through the last few months of how we have been, a lot of people have been the same. Just able and having the time to dissect their homes and kind of look into the amount of things that they have.

Christy:
So if somebody is trying to get organized, where do they start? Because it's pretty overwhelming.

April Goldade:
Yeah, totally. So kind of just back to even your situation, Lora, usually those are the tipping points, if someone is like, "Okay, I'm done. I can't handle this anymore." And so it's easy to jump in and just start clearing things out, but really, if you don't go into it without a good plan and a reason, like an end goal in mind, you're just going to be spinning your wheels and you'll probably end up back where you are in six months or 12 months or whatever it is.

April Goldade:
So I always just say that it's super important to sit down and lay out a plan, figure out your goals and know why you want to do this, so that's where you start. It's not really necessarily a physical space, but that's where I believe that it has to start there.

Lora:
Well I just find it so overwhelming, right? Because we have these houses and most of us have kids and husbands and hobbies and toys that the kids have outgrown. And it's like, "Okay, this weekend I'm going to dedicate to doing this," but it just feels too much. So, do you recommend we chip away at it? I guess you're saying do a plan, so one kind of full sweep or how do you kind of go about it?

April Goldade:
Yeah, and it is so different for everybody. It comes down to personalities, what's realistic for timeframes, all that sort of stuff. So you can identify a lot of that when you sit down and plan it out. I'm a big believer in starting small and kind of taking small steps because it's such a psychological thing too is that we see progress that way a lot faster, and so we start to build momentum and we see results. So it makes us feel better and more accomplished, and we know that what we're doing is actually working. So you can kind of stay on track.

April Goldade:
And as far as if it's a clean sweep for someone, I mean, obviously the Marie Kondo philosophy is awesome in so many ways, but it doesn't work for everybody too and their mindset and what they're just available to do. So you can either pare it down by doing categories or doing rooms. And my suggestion is always sort of to really think about the pain point. Just for example, it could be someone's mudroom. If that's your main point of entrance as a family, coming in from your garage or whatever, it often can be a catch up.

Christy:
So pain point? So is that like your worst [crosstalk 00:04:41] in the house?

April Goldade:
Pardon? Sorry.

Christy:
So, is pain point your worst room in the house?

April Goldade:
Yeah, yeah. The worst area. Exactly. That just drives you crazy. For me, it's a junk drawer. I hate junk drawers.

Christy:
I actually, yeah. I've got two large junk drawers.

April Goldade:
And again, that's where everyone's different, right? So it's really about, you have to customize it to what works for you and your family and your needs.

Christy:
Well, okay. But how do we keep it that way? Like I know my junk drawers, I will go on a spree of like, "Okay, everything out. I'm organizing it, I'm putting it all back in." And then literally four weeks later I was like, "I swore I had like eight packages of tape in there and [crosstalk 00:05:32] and it's driving me nuts and I can't find anything."

April Goldade:
Yeah. Yeah. It's hard because obviously there's other hands in your house as well and I think that's why I don't like them because they kind of already give that allowance that this is where it's the catchall. This is where things come to die, or I don't know where they go, or I don't want to put them back where they're supposed to go, so this is where I put them. That's where I do think, everything having a home and creating consistency, and it's not something that happens overnight. And I still, this is something that I've been doing just naturally in my life for many, many years, because it's something I enjoy doing, but as I have dug deeper into the psychology behind it and actually being in homes with other people and things like that, and really realizing that it comes down to what you need.

April Goldade:
So like creating good habits, I guess you could say and consistency and having that, "Okay. This is what I want is," say just for a small goal is, "I want to make sure that everything from the kids' playroom goes back to the kids' play room. At the end of the day, they can bring it up. They can play in the living room with me as I'm working at the table or whatever," but say that's goal number one. Then it's about getting that consistency that the kids, "Okay, at the end of every day, this is what we're doing. We're taking everything back down." It's changing habits, it's creating consistency and kind of new philosophies, I guess, through your house.

Lora:
So that's what I find too, is like in our house, I have a habit of whenever the kids bring stuff down I put it all on the stairs so the next time they go up, they need to take it up. And I say to them, as every good mom would, "Please put it where it belongs." But I don't even think they know what that means, because if I was to put it where it belongs, I'm not even sure I know what that means. So, how do you instill that in your kids? I guess you have to do it from an example, right? So I need to be able to teach by example and say, "Okay, this is actually where coats go. They don't get piled up."

Christy:
[crosstalk 00:07:58] needs to be more organized apparently.

April Goldade:
But you nailed it, Lora, honestly it... Because it's been a huge struggle for me in the sense that I've had this with a lot of feedback from people, is getting the rest of the family on board. And it is about leading by example, because at the end of the day, this is as a family, you kind of have to come together and what works for you and things like that, but ultimately a lot of times the mothers are the ones that are kind of at the helm of this. And so, if I want my home organized and in a certain manner I have to take that responsibility, but it doesn't mean that you lower your expectations and it doesn't mean that you don't have those expectations of everyone to pitch in. And another thing too is getting them involved in it, as you're going through, say for instance, their rooms and stuff.

April Goldade:
My son is six, and we go through at least twice a year and he hates giving up toys. It's the worst thing in the world that I'm making him get rid of toys, but it's also a time for us to clear out, but him to kind of decide where he wants to put things. Now if it was up to him everything would be out on shelves and that's just not how it is, but that also then when I say to him, "Okay, go put your transformers back." He knows where his transformers go.

Christy:
It has to feel good to them. I do think that they do feel better, as opposed to it just being launched into a pile. And that's the end of it.

April Goldade:
Yes. Yeah, totally.

Christy:
So you're launching, speaking of launching, you're launching an online program.

April Goldade:
I am, yes. I'm very excited. I'm doing an eight week course where it's a digital course that I'm... It's kind of great timing because our world lives on Zoom right now, so we do weekly meetings and coaching calls and we go through, an eight week period of them decluttering their home. And so we start off with setting the plan and, getting to understand kind of more internal stuff with why they're doing it, what they need for their family, giving them opportunity and tools to speak with their partners and the family of this is what I'm setting out to do, and these are what I want and then taking them through the declutter process and then the maintenance side of it. So like building habits and things like that we'll be doing throughout, but then just some different automation hacks and things like that they can do to make it easy and hopefully maintain.

Christy:
Where can they find that program?

April Goldade:
So I'm still just working on my final parts of the sales page. I am actually doing my webinar next week, and so that information will be up on my website by Sunday. So they [crosstalk 00:10:50] to aprilgoldade.com and there'll be information there for the webinar, which will give more, it's a free webinar, but it'll give more in depth about what the course is going to be about and just if it's right for them and things like that.

Christy:
That's neat.

April Goldade:
Yeah.

Christy:
I guess if we're looking at this, so how can we relate this back to Lora and I's business?

April Goldade:
Yeah.

Christy:
So I know our number one question that we get from clients that are getting ready to list their house. They're like, "What do we do in our house? What can we do? What do we got to do to get ready to list?" And so I would love to hear your point of view, because most of it is kind of that declutter process, but how do we position it for sellers that listing your house is not easy. It's like a big job. So how would you, what would you recommend sellers do to tackle that?

April Goldade:
Yeah, it is it's the same. And the great thing is it kind of gets them a jumpstart on having to do it, because it can be something that a task that people procrastinate with for a long time. But in my experience and kind of what I've learned through this is that it's about your buyer, potential buyers will go through everything and you guys can obviously speak to this way better than I can, but from my understanding, they'll go through everything. So they want to imagine, they want to be able to walk into that house and imagine themselves living in it.

April Goldade:
So they want to make sure their stuff will fit, their furniture, that there's enough storage, things like that. Definitely clearing as much of your surface level, that you can. Counter tops clear, as much wall space as you can clear, taking out big clunky furniture, things that will allow them to kind of see the more grand space is what I suggest.

April Goldade:
This is hard for people, that sometimes taking down, depersonalizing it, in a sense, of maybe getting rid of a big picture wall and things like that, taking that down. Hallways are big. A lot of times they can be those homes for picture walls, but they can also close that space in. So clearing those out. Your entry way, you want it to be welcoming, so pare it down. Obviously making sure there's not clutters of shoes and utilizing the space that they have to house the minimal amount of stuff that they need to continue living until their home sells is kind of how to sum it up, because [inaudible 00:13:24] pantry and things like that. You walk in and that's what you want to understand, is how much room do I have to put my things in?

Lora:
So what we always say to our people is take off kind of the first layer, seems to resonate with a lot of our clients and then beyond that, make sure that there're spaces, so when the buyer comes through, they can envision putting their stuff in that space without it looking like there's not enough space because you kind of overloaded all the areas, right?

April Goldade:
Yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly. That's the similar suggestions I would say for sure. And then obviously the rooms that sell in my opinion are kitchens, and bathrooms, and the family areas. Laundry rooms, don't ever let a laundry room go unnoticed, because I don't know, I look at a laundry room.

Lora:
Oh, it's like ground zero of production.

April Goldade:
Totally.

Lora:
I mean a clean set of sheets in there or a full five loads of laundry. It's dead to me.

April Goldade:
Exactly. Exactly.

Christy:
Do you have any stores or go to places where you would purchase stuff for bins or containers or-

Lora:
Label makers.

Christy:
Yeah. Labeler.

April Goldade:
I do love my label maker. I'm also big on sustainability as much as you can be, a lot of people get caught up with the magazines, which I do too. I love them all, and it's so easy to see the perfectly simplified everything unison, but it's sometimes not reality. And also then you could go out and purchase those things and actually not even start your decluttering process. So one thing I would just remind people to be is conscious of that and kind of know, and have your plan where you're going to put things before you go and purchase them. I'm a big HomeSense, Winners person, you can always find such great things there and organizers for your drawers, for your fridge, all that sort of stuff, your pantries.

April Goldade:
And then obviously online, Amazon. I love to touch and feel things. So that's a big part, just quality and things like that. There is the container store, but I've been on the lookout for something Canadian that you can find, a Canadian brand that I could work with, but I haven't really done, I guess you could say, to that scale either. I feel that to go to something like that, you would be doing quite a large scale of an organizing job. Another one that I like, it would be... I don't want to call it multilevel marketing. That's not the right word for it, but it's called Thirty-One. And there is like marketers or whatever you'd want to... Account managers or whatever that they have for it.

April Goldade:
But so it's a home based business, but you can order through them and you can personalize everything. You can get savings on personalized bins for toys or with the kids' names on them, or gloves, [inaudible 00:00:16:37], whatever you can, and it's really cool. They have great styles. The quality is awesome. They have really cool fabrics and stuff, and men's sports gear and stuff like that, small things to fit under your bed. So I really like that one. It's a little bit more costly, but you can really personalize the space that way though.

Lora:
And it's called Thirty-One?

April Goldade:
Thirty-One. Yeah, and it's actually the number written out, thirtyone.com, and I think you can go on the website and then you just punch in your location and they'll tell you who your sales reps are in the area.

Lora:
Oh, that's a really good hint.

April Goldade:
Yeah.

April Goldade:
What's that?

Christy:
That's a good tip. I like it.

April Goldade:
Yeah. It's just something to even think about just for personalizing, for gifts for people and things like that too. Right.

Lora:
Well, that's a good one.

Christy:
Well, this has been awesome. I think this has been informative and I feel like I need to start setting organizational goals.

Lora:
[crosstalk 00:17:36] to sign up for your class.

Christy:
I love that you have your website, aprilgoldade.com. I've been on it. I love your blog. I have bought some pillows for my master bedroom. I am creating a space.

April Goldade:
Nice! Good!

Christy:
I love your saying of taking clutter to calm. I think that it rings true, and I think everybody loves to live in a comfortable, clean, tidy, organized space.

April Goldade:
Yeah. And it's our home. You got to love it and it's supposed to be your sanctuary, so you don't want to be anxious and feel overwhelmed by it, which it happens. I mean, life happens, and that's the biggest takeaway is that it's a journey. You're not going to do it once. And then you're done, because life happens. So.

Christy:
Awesome.

Lora:
Very good tip. Thank you April. This was awesome. We appreciate the time.

April Goldade:
Yeah, I know. Thank you for having me.

About Lora + Christy

We want to make your Kelowna real estate dreams a reality. The team at LORA+CHRISTY puts their strategic marketing expertise and extensive network of contacts & colleagues to work, ensuring that your expectations are met and surpassed. Creating great outcomes for our clients is a product of decades of experience in the Kelowna real estate market. The mission is simple: to be the premier real estate team in the Okanagan Valley.